Does "Arwen" mean anything?

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NineFingered 30/Oct/2006 at 02:07 PM
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We know that "Celebrindal" means "silver foot", that "Earendil" means "lover of the sea", that "Elrond" means "star-lit dome", etc. but can anyone tell me what Arwen means, if it means anything?
NineFingered 30/Oct/2006 at 02:08 PM
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another question, what does "Eldarion" mean?

Magradhaid 30/Oct/2006 at 03:42 PM
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Arwen is from Sindarin ar(a)- gwend, meaning "noble maiden". Eldarion is Quenya for "of the Eldar" or "Son of the Eldar".
LotrLJ 31/Oct/2006 at 12:37 PM
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Arwen means Lady. Her full name us Arwen Evenstar.
Sil 07/Nov/2006 at 02:36 AM
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Which can be seen from "haudh-en-arwen", a mound raised for someone else, but which means "mound of the lady"..
nEUroTIc 07/Nov/2006 at 07:39 AM
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as tyrhael said arwen means noble maiden and undomiel means  evening star..hence she was also called arwen evenstar...Eldarion Telcontar means "Scion of the Eldar"...Telcontar is "Strider", one of Aragorn’s aliases, in the Elven language sindarin..
Maewen 07/Nov/2006 at 10:29 AM
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> in the Elven language sindarin.

At least Arwen is Sindarin, yes. But All other words (undómiel and eldarion telcontar) are Quenya by the way
NineFingered 18/Nov/2006 at 04:09 PM
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sorry, neurotic, I don’t like these profiles at all. Sorry if any administrator is offended, but I just don’t like it.
KnightWolf 19/Nov/2006 at 05:49 PM
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Does "Legolas" mean anything?
linger_you 20/Nov/2006 at 06:06 AM
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Arwen is from Sindarin ar(a)- gwend, meaning "noble maiden".
Magradhaid 20/Nov/2006 at 08:47 AM
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linger_you: Hmm... that looks exactly like what I wrote.
KnightWolf: Legolas means "Greenleaf" from laeg go-lass. Laeg (silvan leg) is a word for ’green’ not commonly found; calen is used more. Go-lass is "leaves" as in "a collection of leaves, foliage". His title Lasgalen also literally means "Greenleaf".
Cigfa 20/Nov/2006 at 04:53 PM
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While ’Arwen’ is Sindarin for royal princess, it is also a welsh word for a young noble maiden :) ’Eldarion’ of course, is Sindarin as well for Son of the Eldar, or simpler put Elven Son :)
Kaos the Gold 22/Nov/2006 at 02:51 AM
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Arwen souns really welsh, too.  Many welsh names have teh sound ’wen’ in it, which means white, really.
   Bronwen is a name of a bird, Gwenllian is a popular welsh feamle name and the nam of two of wales’s finest heroines from the middle ages.  Considering that welsh was one of Tolkien’s favorite languages, I think that Arwen has a really welsh source.
Cigfa 22/Nov/2006 at 10:33 AM
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In fact, the name Arwen does come from the Welsh language, Neidr Wen. From my analysis, it means ’Muse’, referring no doubt to either the voice or melodic ability of the young woman. I think it fits in rather well for Tolkien’s princess character. Also consider, if I recall correctly...wasn’t it her voice that Aragorn first heard that enchanted him before he actually caught sight of her?

---------> http://123-baby-names.com/origin_meaning_Arwen.html

Aelindis 22/Nov/2006 at 10:21 PM
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Cigfa & Neidr Wen: It’s a matter of common knowledge that Sindarin, especially Sindarin phonology, has been "devised to give it a linguistic character very like (though not identical with) British-Welsh: because that character is one that I find, in some linguistic moods, very attractive; and because it seems to fit the rather ’Celtic’ type of legends and stories told of its speakers." (Tolkien, Letter #144)

The meanings of the words are different however.

The composition/meaning of the word Arwen within Tolkien’s language is quite obvious, cf. the above post by Tyrhael

Battlehamster 23/Nov/2006 at 03:19 PM
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I know this isn’t entirely relevant, so I’ll try to keep it short, but what parent would name their kid "Lady?"
Aelindis 24/Nov/2006 at 03:14 AM
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Battlehamster: 1. The literal meaning of Arwen is "noble maiden". (Once again, cf. Tyrhael’s post, if you please.)
2. There are numerous names with identical or similar meanings in many real languages, for instance "Adela" (from the Germanic element adal  meaning "noble").
 
I cannot think of any reason why Arwen meaning "noble maiden" should not be a suitable name.

 

Galin 25/Nov/2006 at 08:43 AM
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I agree with Aelindis and would add that if there is no evidence to certainly decide the issue one way or the other, the name Arwen could be an epesse or ’After-name’: a nickname not necessarily given by kin and mostly given as a title of admiration or honour.

I didn’t do any homework to actually check (lazy), so again I’m only presenting the epesse idea as another possibility -- in case it’s possible.